Annual CTA Metro NY Membership Meeting 1/11/2015

Sunday, January 11, 2015
2:30-4.30 pm – program

AND

4:30-5:00 pm ANNUAL Membership meeting of
CTA Metro NY Chapter
20 Washington Square North

Please join the brief ANNUAL membership meeting after the presentation. In addition to the annual board member elections there will be Chapter updates including on the Spring Fund Raiser Memorial for Sr. Mary Nerney and support for the Steps program for incarcerated victims of domestic violence.

ONE OF THE BEST KEPT SECRETS OF THE CHURCH
Beliefs of the 99% &
Laity’s Veto Power
Presenter: John Barry Ryan, S.T.D.
SUGGESTED DONATION $10

Does the dogma or theology make sense with the Gospel?
“By means of the sensus fidelium, the people of God intuitively senses what in a multitude of ideas and doctrines presented to it actually corresponds to the Gospel, and can therefore be received (by the Laity).”
International Theological Commission, Chapter 1, Para 83.

As the Church we have an instinct for the needs of the Church…
“….what is common in all cases (of sensus fidelium) is an active solidarity with the Church, coming from the heart, a feeling of fellowship with other members of the faithful and with the Church as a whole, and an instinct thereby for what the needs of and dangers to the Church are.”
International Theological Commission, Chapter 1, para 90
Dr. Ryan will present, “Sensus Fidelium: We’ve Only Just Begun.”
He will discuss what’s new fifty years after Lumen Gentium’s promotion of the sensus fidelium and what are its limits and possibilities now that it appears to have been given new life under Pope Francis.

Eugene Cullen Kennedy, writing in the NCR in July, 2014 quoted Fordham theologian Bradford Hinze saying that Catholics may deny assent to church teachings if they do not recognize in that teaching “the voice of Christ”. In this Hinze is following Aquinas who taught that whenever there is conflict
between one’s conscience and church teaching one must one’s conscience.

Kennedy sees this as a good description of “reception” “which has been understood as one of the gifts of the church from its beginnings.”
Reception is defined in the Harper Collins Encyclopedia of Catholicism as a process whereby the faithful accept teachings of the church. In the ancient church confessions of faith, liturgies, and decrees of councils received general recognition and authority by reception. Reception by the believing community has always been the test of whether a teaching is to be regarded as authoritative or not.

The canon of scriptural books was decided through reception by the community of believers. The non-reception of Pope Paul VI’s restatement of the church’s ban on birth control is understood as rejection by the believing community.

When non-reception occurs, the teaching in question is erroneous, inadequately expressed, or judged unbelievable by the majority of faithful Catholics. Among teachings from which assent is being largely withheld
in the industrialized West: same-sex marriage, homosexuality, divorce-remarriage-Eucharist.

John Barry Ryan, S.T.D. (Institut Catholique de Paris), B.A. and Licentiate in Theology (University of Strasbourg, France), Diploma in Liturgy (Institut Supérieur de Liturgie, Paris), Professor Emeritus of Religious Studies, Manhattan College, Former Associate Director of the Notre Dame Center for Pastoral Liturgy, Founding Member and Former President of the North American Academy of Liturgy, author of books and articles on liturgical subjects and on Native American Peoples.

Please Register on Eventbrite Here: http://bit.ly/1JboeOe

CTA Metro NY Membership Meeting 11/16

Join us for a

CTA Metro NY membership meeting on

Sunday, Nov. 16, 2014

2:30 – 4:30 pm

20 Washington Square North

Program:

A video of Miriam Therese Winter’s inspirational closing keynote address to the 2013 CTA National Conference, followed by a discussion,

AND

A report-back on the 2014 CTA National Conference and a discussion of follow-up options for the chapter.

Miriam Therese Winter, a Medical Mission Sister, is professor of liturgy, worship and spirituality at Hartford Seminary in Hartford, Conn. She is the author of 15 books, including ParadoxologyThe Singer and the Song andThe Gospel According to Mary. She is the composer of 15 recordings, including the gold record album “Joy is Like the Rain.” She has served the poor on three continents and is a popular speaker in the United States, Canada and Australia.

 

Michael Morwood Talk

On September 28th, 2014, The Metro New York Chapter of Call to Action hosted a talk with Michael Morwood, author of In Memory of Jesus. Morwood, a former Catholic priest and progressive Catholic theologian, argued for a modernized understanding of the Church. Not unlike CTA, Morwood suggested that the Church must evolve to reflect realities of the present world.

Morwood’s talk centered on the idea that as Catholics, we must re-examine what we believe, why we have these beliefs, and how we might come to develop a new image of God. First, Morwood proposed that Catholics need to consider what we are being asked to imagine about God and the origins of these notions. According to Morwood, many Catholic teachings have 2,000-year-old roots and are not appropriate for modern audiences.

Morwood explained that historically, God has historically been presented as a “string-puller” who locked us out of heaven. This image of God waives us of responsibility to truly assist in creating God’s Kingdom and encourages us to focus on symbolic gestures as opposed to taking real action. Instead, Morwood suggested that the onus needs to be on us to act as Jesus and that we need to view it as our own personal responsibility to create God’s Kingdom. He explained that when we complete decent acts of human kindness, God is rising up within us and we are acting as Jesus.

The message of Morwood’s lecture is particularly relevant for an audience of CTA members who are committed to taking real steps to adapt the Catholic Church so that it better connects with the contemporary society. Art McGrath, President of CTA’s Metro NY Chapter, expressed the hope that Morwood’s talk would expose Catholics to “a new story of creation and the universe.”Morwood agreed that he hoped his talk would help CTA members to recognize that “you can’t shape the Church of the future on yesterday’s theology.”

In order to create a modern Church and act like Jesus, we must be willing to take bold steps to design a community  that speaks to modern believers. If we are unable to take these steps, Morwood warned that people will feel forced to walk away from Jesus. Turning this message into tactical steps, Morwood explained that groups like CTA must create “places and opportunities to talk freely about our faith and to openly ask questions.” Events like Morwood’s lecture provide a critical forum for Catholics to openly question their understanding of religion and to help design tomorrow’s Church.

Secret accounts paid for clergy misconduct but left church open to financial abuse

secret accounts

An offering box is stationed near the front door of the Cathedral of St. Paul, the home church of the Archdiocese of St. Paul and Minneapolis. Internal financial reports show the archdiocese for years diverted millions of dollars away from its traditional work to deal with clergy misconduct. The system allowed church leaders to remove priests who had committed child abuse or other infractions without attracting attention. But it also left the church vulnerable to embezzlement. (Jennifer Simonson/MPR News)

The Rev. Stanley Kozlak served nearly three decades in the Archdiocese of St. Paul and Minneapolis. But then he fathered a child and the archdiocese needed him gone.

Removing Kozlak quietly wouldn’t be cheap, but church leaders knew how to move money discreetly. The archdiocese held two secret accounts, controlled by the archbishop, designed to make problems like Kozlak disappear.

To get him out of active ministry, Archbishop Harry Flynn agreed in 2002 to pay the fallen priest $1,900 a month “disability” for life, plus $800 a month in rent for life, and $980 a month “to replace the social security payment until Father Kozlak reaches age 67 when he would receive his full social security.”

Kozlak’s package was part of a secret financial system that let archdiocese leaders divert millions of dollars away from traditional church work to deal with clergy misconduct.

http://minnesota.publicradio.org/collections/catholic-church/2014/01/23/secret-accounts-kept-clergy-misconduct-quiet-but-left-archdiocese-finances-exposed/

German and Swiss churches publish their Synod questionnaire

cyonod questionaire

German and Swiss churches publish their Synod questionnaire results
Reports from bishops’ conferences in Germany and Switzerland show a clear divergence between what the church teaches on marriage, sexuality and family life and what Catholics — even those active in parish life — personally believe.

The differences are seen “above all when it comes to pre-marital cohabitation, (the status of the) divorced and remarried, birth control and homosexuality,” said the German bishops’ report, posted Tuesday on their conference website in German, Italian and English. (Read the German bishops’ report here.) The text is a summary of the official responses from all of Germany’s 27 dioceses and about 20 German Catholic organizations and institutions to a Vatican questionnaire published in preparation for October’s extraordinary Synod of Bishops on the family.

The Swiss bishops’ conference published an initial report Wednesday based on 25,000 responses, similar in most cases to those received by the German bishops.

“Most of the baptized have an image of the church that, on the one hand, is family friendly in its attitude, whilst at the same time considering her sexual morality to be unrealistic,” the German survey found. Both the German and the Swiss reports said Catholics in their countries accept the church’s vision of marriage as a life-long union of a man and a woman open to having children, and hope to realize that vision in their own family.

However, the German dioceses reported that “‘pre-marital unions’ are not only a relevant pastoral reality, but one which is almost universal,” since between 90 percent and 100 percent of couples who seek a Catholic wedding are already living together, despite church teaching that sex outside of marriage is sinful. “Many, in fact, consider it irresponsible to marry without living together beforehand,” the report said.

Much of the German summary was dedicated to questions concerning divorced and civilly remarried Catholics, who the report said account for a significant share of Catholic couples, including those actively involved in parish life and church activities. The bishops’ conference said one-third of all marriages in Germany end in divorce, and while “Catholics’ marriages are somewhat more stable than average,” the difference is not great.

The summary said many of the respondents supported a 2013 initiative of the archdiocese of Freiburg to encourage divorced and remarried couples to speak to a local priest about their situation, suggesting that their status could be resolved as a matter of personal conscience.

Cardinal-designate Gerhard Muller, prefect of the Congregation for the Doctrine of the Faith, has criticized the initiative and said Catholics “convinced in their conscience that a previous marriage was invalid” must have that belief confirmed by a church tribunal.

But reforming and streamlining the church’s annulment process would not make a big difference in Germany, the bishops’ report said, because most remarried people do not regard their original unions as “null and void,” but rather as having failed. “They therefore frequently consider an annulment procedure” — which declares that an apparent marriage was null from the start — “to be dishonest.”

According to the church, a person who has not received an annulment is in most cases still bound by his or her original marriage vows and not free to enter into another union. Someone who remarries under such circumstances is therefore excluded from Communion, though not from church life.

Pope Benedict XVI, Pope Francis and many bishops around the world have considered the status of divorced and civilly remarried Catholics a pressing pastoral problem; it is one of the problems Pope Francis has said is a matter to be considered at the synod.

Both the German bishops’ and the Swiss bishops’ summaries said Catholics in their countries believe the church is unmerciful to Catholics whose first marriages have failed. “Divorce and remarrying frequently lead to a process of becoming distant from the church or of widening the existing gap,” the German bishops reported. “Many no longer wish to be associated with an institution which they regard as unforgiving.”

Both the German and Swiss bishops’ surveys found the vast majority of Catholics reject or simply ignore church teaching that every sexual act between a husband and wife should be open to the transmission of life, therefore ruling out the use of artificial contraceptives.

The Swiss bishops said that “approximately 60 percent of participants in the consultation support the recognition of and a church blessing for homosexual couples,” though the responses showed “no consensus, but rather a polarization,” with strong negative reactions.

While Catholic teaching insists homosexual people should not be discriminated against, it holds that homosexual acts are always immoral and that marriage can only be a union between one man and one woman.

The German bishops said Catholics in their country, which has recognized “civil partnerships” of same-sex couples since 2000, largely “regard the legal recognition of same-sex civil partnerships and their equal treatment vis-a-vis marriage as a commandment of justice.”

Back to baptism: The Apostolic Role of the Laity

091713_Paul_Lakeland_03

May 4, 2014

3-5pm
20 Washington Square North
Suggested Contribution of $10

Back to baptism: The Apostolic Role of the Laity

Baptism is being rediscovered in today’s church as initiation into a missioned community, where the apostolic responsibilities of the entire priestly people are envisaged and embraced. What does the prophetic element of the baptismal priesthood mean for the way Catholic laypeople must exercise their ministry, both to the world and in the church? How are we prophets to the world and when must we be prophetic towards our own community of faith?

Gender Trouble

SisterInTrouble

Sunday, April 6, 2014
3:00 – 5:00 pm
20 Washington Square North, NYC

Drawing on her new book, Sister Trouble: the Vatican, the Bishops, and the Nuns (Amazon 2103), Marian Ronan, American Catholic studies scholar, writer, and former president of the Women’s Ordination Conference, will discuss the ways in which Catholic teaching on sexuality and gender will, and won’t, change under good Pope Francis. Copies of her book will be available for sale.

Marian Ronan is Research Professor of Catholic Studies at New York Theological Seminary, a multi-racial, multi-lingual Protestant theological school in Manhattan. She was a member of the faculty at the Graduate Theological Union in Berkeley, CA from 1999 to 2009. She is the author of five books, including Wisdom’s Feast: Sophia in Study and Celebration (Sheed and Ward, 1996) and the Future of American Catholicism (Columbia University Press, 2009).

Secret accounts paid for clergy misconduct but left church open to financial abuse

Secret accounts paid for clergy misconduct but left church open to financial abuse

By Tom Scheck, Minnesota Public Radio

Jan. 23, 2014

 

 

An offering box is stationed near the front door of the Cathedral of St. Paul, the home church of the Archdiocese of St. Paul and Minneapolis. Internal financial reports show the archdiocese for years diverted millions of dollars away from its traditional work to deal with clergy misconduct. The system allowed church leaders to remove priests who had committed child abuse or other infractions without attracting attention. But it also left the church vulnerable to embezzlement. (Jennifer Simonson/MPR News)

 

The Rev. Stanley Kozlak served nearly three decades in the Archdiocese of St. Paul and Minneapolis. But then he fathered a child and the archdiocese needed him gone.

Removing Kozlak quietly wouldn’t be cheap, but church leaders knew how to move money discreetly. The archdiocese held two secret accounts, controlled by the archbishop, designed to make problems like Kozlak disappear.

To get him out of active ministry, Archbishop Harry Flynn agreed in 2002 to pay the fallen priest $1,900 a month “disability” for life, plus $800 a month in rent for life, and $980 a month “to replace the social security payment until Father Kozlak reaches age 67 when he would receive his full social security.”

Kozlak’s package was part of a secret financial system that let archdiocese leaders divert millions of dollars away from traditional church work to deal with clergy misconduct.

http://minnesota.publicradio.org/collections/catholic-church/2014/01/23/secret-accounts-kept-clergy-misconduct-quiet-but-left-archdiocese-finances-exposed/

Sex Abuse: The De Facto Privilege of Clergy

Sex Abuse: The De Facto Privilege of Clergy
By Kieran Tapsell, a retired solicitor and barrister with degrees in theology and law
AUSTRALIA
Pearls and Irritations, a blog of John Menadue
Posted on January 15, 2014 by John Menadue

Archbishop Jozef Wesolowski’s Extradition Declined

Archbishop Jozef Wesolowski’s Extradition Declined: Former Papal Nuncio Accused Of Sex Abuse Remains In Vatican
Huffington Post. Posted: 01/10/2014   Updated: 01/11/2014
Archbishop Jozef Wesolowski extradition
This March 15, 2013 photo shows Archbishop Josef Wesolowski, former papal nuncio for the Dominican Republic, in Santo Domingo. | ASSOCIATED PRESS
Archbishop Jozef Wesolowski will not be extradited to his native Poland, despite accusations of sex abuse there and in the Dominican Republic, where he served as papal nuncio until his August 2013 dismissal.
The Warsaw Office of the Prosecutor reported the the Vatican had tersely replied to their extradition request, saying that “Archbishop Wesolowski is a citizen of the Vatican, and Vatican law does not allow for his extradition,” according to Catholic Culture.